PROGRAMMABLE TECHNOLOGIES WEB SITE

A scientific study of the problems of digital engineering for space flight systems,
with a view to their practical solution.


X2000 Processors

 

 

gomac_march02_final.pdf

gomac_march02_final.ppt


Advanced Avionics Systems for Dependable Computing in Future Space Exploration

Leon Alkalai, Savio Chau, Ann Tai

Center for Integrated Space Microsystems
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology

GOMAC – 2002, March 12th, 2002

X2000 Systems and Technologies for Missions to the Outer Planets

D. Woerner
Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena, CA USA
49th International Astronautical Congress
Sept 28-0ct 2,1998/Melbourne, Australia

IAA-98-IAA.4.1.02

98-1169.pdf
(mirrored from JPL public www site).


Abstract:
The Deep Space System Technology Program (DSSTP) is managed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and is also called X2000. X2000 is organized to create “cores” of advanced flight and ground systems for the exploration of the outer planets and beyond; cores are the engineering elements of flight and ground systems. Mission specific elements such as instruments will be developed by another team. Each X2000 delivery gets its requirements from a set of planned missions, or “mission customers”

The first set of missions leads to some outstanding requirements:

  1. Long-life (12-14 years for a mission to the Kuiper belt).
  2. Total Ionizing Dose (TID) of 4 Mrad (for a Europa Orbiter--after only 30 days in orbit).
  3. Average power consumption less than or equal to 150 Watts.
  4. Autonomous operations that result in an extreme reduction in operations costs.
  5. Large scale software re-use must be enabled.

The technologies needed to meet these requirements cover a broad spectrum and revolutionize the designs of flight and ground systems JPL and NASA will fly to the outer planets.

This paper describes the X2000 first delivery and its technologies following a brief overview of the program.


NASA’s X2000 Program - an Institutional Approach to Enabling Smaller Spacecraft

Dr. Leslie J. Deutsch and Chris Salvo
Advanced Flight Systems Program
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
California Institute of Technology

David Woerner
X2000 First Delivery Project
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
California Institute of Technology

99-0049.pdf

Abstract
The number of NASA science missions per year is increasing from less than one to more than six. Atthe same time, individual mission budgets are smaller and cannot afford their own dedicated technology developments. In response to this, NASA has formed the X2000 Program. This program, which is divided into a set of subsequent “deliveries” will provide the basic avionics, power, communications, and software capability for future science missions. X2000 First Delivery, which will be completed in early 2001, will provide a full-functioned one MRAD tolerant flight computer, power switching electronics, a highly efficient radioisotope power source, and a transponder that provides high-level services at both 8.4 GHz and 32 GHz bands. The X2000 Second Delivery, which will be completed in the 2003 time frame, will enable complete spacecraft in the 10-50 kg class. All capabilities delivered by the X2000 program will be commercialized within the US and therefore will be available for others to use. Although the immediate customers for these technologies are deep space missions, most of the capabilities being delivered are generic in nature and will be equally applicable to Earth Observation mis- sions.


Revolutionary Systems And Technologies For Missions To The Outer Planets

Davide Woerner

Second IAA Symposium on Realistic Near-Term Advanced Scientific Space Missions
June 26-July 1, 1998
Aosta, Italy.

Aostapaper.pdf
(mirrored from JPL public www site).

Abstract
The Advanced Deep Space System Development Program is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA and is also called X2000. X2000 is organized to create advanced flight and ground systems for the exploration of the outer planets and beyond; it has been created to develop the engineering elements of flight and ground systems. Payloads will be developed by another team. Each X2000 delivery gets its requirements from a set of planned missions, or “mission customers”. The X2000 First Delivery Project supports missions to the Sun (to 4 solar radii), Europa (looking for a liquid ocean), Mars (in support of several Mars missions including a sample return), a comet (including a sample return), and Pluto followed by a trip into the Kuiper belt. This set of missions leads to some outstanding requirements:
  1. Long-life (10-12 years)
  2. Total Ionizing Dose of 4 Mrad (for a Europa Orbiter)
  3. Average power consumption less than or equal to 150 Watts
  4. Autonomous operations that result in an extreme reduction in operations costs.

This paper describes the X2000 first delivery and its technologies following a brief overview of the program.

X2000/MDS Home Page X2000 Home page.

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Last Revised: February 03, 2010
Digital Engineering Institute
Web Grunt: Richard Katz